Haystacks in the snow

Haystacks (Effect of Snow and Sun), 1891, by Claude Monet

Haystacks (Effect of Snow and Sun), 1891, by Claude Monet

In 1891, an exhibit by Claude Monet in the Durand-Ruel gallery in Paris included a series of 15 haystacks. It was unusual at the time for an artist to exhibit so many paintings of the same subject at once, and it was a conscious effort by Monet to make viewers focus on what he was most interested in, the variations of light and color in nature.

In honor of the first day of winter, here are some of the winter haystack paintings. Many painters of the time would sketch outdoors and create the final painting in the comfort of their studio, but not Monet. He would set up his big canvas and paints outside in all seasons, even the freezing cold. Talk about becoming one with nature!

Over his career he made at least 140 winter paintings outside, which is a level of dedication that I think few artists today could match. These tiny reproductions cannot replicate the beauty of the originals, but you can click on each image to see a larger version of the painting. You can learn more about Monet’s haystack series here.

Grainstacks, Snow Effect, 1891, by Claude Monet

Grainstacks, Snow Effect, 1891, by Claude Monet

Haystack, Morning Snow Effect, 1891, by Claude Monet

Haystack, Morning Snow Effect, 1891, by Claude Monet

Stack of Wheat (Snow Effect, Overcast Day), 1891, by Claude Monet

Stack of Wheat (Snow Effect, Overcast Day), 1891, by Claude Monet

Wheatstacks, Snow Effect, Morning, 1891, by Claude Monet

Wheatstacks, Snow Effect, Morning, 1891, by Claude Monet

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One Response to “Haystacks in the snow”

  1. Starr White says:

    I have always loved Monet’s haystacks. They are mesmerizing in both their simplicity and complexity – all at the same time! they also make me feel somewhat validated for continuing to explore the same subjects over and over again. Thanks for sharing!